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EAPM: blokavimo atlaisvinimas, įspėjimai apie trečią bangą

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Welcome, dear health colleagues, to the first post-Easter update from the European Alliance for Personalised Medicine (EAPM). We hope you all had an excellent break and, if you are based in one of the more fortunate countries such as the UK, that you are beginning to enjoy the release from coronavirus lockdown restrictions. EAPM certainly has some busy months ahead, looking forward to work on Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and Real World Evidence (RWE). That is for the future – for now, here are the updates on the leading health stories of recent days, rašo EAPM vykdomasis direktorius dr. Denisas Horganas.

Not-quite Single Market for medicines

It’s not just inequalities in the distribution of vaccines that is causing worries. A group of MEPs have written to the Commission to push for more equitable access to medicines in the EU, maintaining that currently there’s no “no genuine Single Market for pharmaceuticals”. The current EU rules create unfair discrimination against member states with smaller health systems and pharmaceutical markets. The decision to effectively place a product on the member states’ markets is solely based on the pharmaceutical companies’ commercial and economic interests. While the current legislation provides the industry with the right to place their products on the markets of all member states, there is no mirroring right entitling the member states to get access to those products that have been authorised and placed on the EU Single Market.

It is a known fact that unfortunately private companies often have no interest or incentive to place a medicinal product in the small member states. This situation creates difficulty in accessing affordable medicines for certain patients, higher prices, and often even the withdrawal of particular products. This scenario which is faced by multiple states has resulted in a long-standing structural problem and most member states have joined regional groupings like the Valletta Declaration to try and combat this issue.

Long-term effects of COVID-19

What are the long-term side effects of COVID-19?

Most people who have had COVID-19 expect their symptoms to disappear after a few weeks, but some continue to experience effects months after recovery. People who suffer from persistent symptoms after recovering from the acute illness, also known as “long-haulers,” are often healthy prior to getting infected with COVID-19. This can occur in up to 10% of those infected with the virus.

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Common long-term COVID-19 symptoms include:

  • Dusulys
  • A lingering cough
  • Chest pain and heart palpitations
  • Dizziness and lightheadedness
  • Fatigue with limited ability to exercise or even perform activities of daily living
  • Sąnarių ir raumenų skausmas
  • Skonio ir kvapo praradimas
  • Sleep disturbances with insomnia and sleepiness during the daytime
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as difficulty swallowing, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and indigestion.
  • Depressed mood and anxiety

Because long-term effects of COVID-19 vary from person to person, it is difficult to determine when they will end. The best approach is to be evaluated by your physician or a specialized post-COVID clinic – especially if you have persistent symptoms that are affecting your quality of life. It is also important to seek help if symptoms of anxiety, fear and depressed mood develop.

Digital Green Certificates

The Digital Green Certificate will be a proof that a person has been vaccinated against COVID-19, received a negative test result or recovered from COVID-19. It will be available, free of charge, in digital or paper format. It will include a QR code to ensure security and authenticity of the certificate. The Commission will build a gateway to ensure all certificates can be verified across the EU, and support Member States in the technical implementation of certificates. Member States remain responsible to decide which public health restrictions can be waived for travellers but will have to apply such waivers in the same way to travellers holding a Digital Green Certificate.

Values and Transparency Vice President Věra Jourová said: “The Digital Green Certificate offers an EU-wide solution to ensure that EU citizens benefit from a harmonized digital tool to support free movement in the EU. This is a good message in support of recovery. Our key objectives are to offer an easy to use, non-discriminatory and secure tool that fully respects data protection. And we continue working towards international convergence with other partners.”

Germany’s ICU beds filling up

It has been noted that Germany’s seven-day incidence rate had dropped, possibly because of the Easter holidays, but that the number of occupied ICU beds across Germany was increasing “much too quickly”.

During the first wave of the pandemic, the German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (DIVI) set up a central registry that records and publicizes the situation in hospitals, or rather in intensive care units, on a daily basis.

A glance at the current map shows that the situation is critical again in some towns and municipalities, meaning that less than 10% of intensive care beds are free — and in some cases none at all. DIVI President Gernot Marx gave a clear statement during a press conference: “Every single day counts; we quickly need a hard lockdown of two or three weeks to lower the number of cases and give us more time for vaccinations.”

UK risks third wave

Experts are warning that the UK is risking a third wave as it reopens pubs, hairdressers, outdoor attractions and shops as of 12 April. While prevalence of COVID-19 has fallen to an average of 30.7 per 100,000 across the country, there are hotspots where that rate is double. “However, many people [in those areas] cannot afford to self-isolate,” said Stephen Griffin, of Leeds University medical school. “We need to tackle that issue urgently or the virus will come back again.”

Euthanasia bill fails in France

A bill that would have allowed euthanasia for people with incurable diseases failed last week in France’s National Assembly, despite clear majority support. Because the bill was put on the agenda on a day reserved for a minority group, the chamber had until midnight to pass it. To nip the bill in the bud, a handful of MPs wrote up thousands of amendments to it, making it impossible to debate in a single day.

Romanian hospitals under pressure

Pagal Rumunijos viešai neatskleista informacija, Romanian hospitals are overwhelmed. Speaking on Sunday (11 April), Health Minister Vlad Voiculescu said that there were 167 children in hospital — 16 in intensive care — with the minister explaining that they were implementing several measures to manage the cases. According to vietos žiniasklaida, these include using beds in hospitals that the government had tried to keep for other conditions, such as a cancer institute and another facility for chronic conditions. Voiculescu urged people to wear masks, avoid crowds and stay at home to try and reduce pressure on the health care system. 

Best-case expectations for Q2

In a perfect world, the EU should receive around 470 million doses of approved vaccines by the end of the second quarter. Still, few EU officials believe everything will go according to plan. “We have seen from past experience all sorts of things can go wrong,” said one diplomat this week. One ongoing source of tension is that these second-quarter doses won’t be distributed equally across the EU, because some countries purchased fewer doses than they could have based on their pro-rata allocation. Many smaller and poorer countries, for example, banked heavily on the cheaper Oxford/AstraZeneca jab and purchased fewer mRNA vaccines. Richer countries, like Germany, Denmark and Malta, bought the surplus instead.

And that is everything for now from EAPM – stay safe, stay well, enjo lockdown easing if you can, see you later in the week.

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